Art Kaleidoscope

Between art and craft

Category Archive: Sculpture

Floating sculpture by Neil Dawson

Floating sculpture by Neil Dawson

Floating sculpture by New Zealand artist Neil Dawson

Floating sculpture by Neil Dawson is unique and easy to recognize for its transparency and escape from the conventions of earthbound pedestal-based display. Prominent New Zealand sculptor Neil Dawson was born in 1948. He graduated from the Ilam School of Art, Canterbury University, and the Victorian College of the Arts in Melbourne. Neil Dawson has created large-scale sculptures from aluminum and stainless steel for the Main Entry at the Australian Stadium for the 2000 Olympic Games. Among his best known works is also installed Fanfare on the Sydney Harbor Bridge for New Year 2004/05. Within NZ his major public works include Chalice in Cathedral Square, Christchurch, and Ferns in Civic Square, Wellington.
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Murano glass art

Pegasus glass sculpture by Murano glass artists

Pegasus glass sculpture by Murano glass artists

Murano glass art is made in Italian town of Murano, on the remote island 1.5 kilometers from Venice. There numerous glass factories and shops are focused on the manufacture of fantastic beauty. Unique Murano products (Antica Murina) are handmade, known since the 10th century and every glass-creation is unique and exclusive. The price may vary from a few euros to hundreds thousands (works of art), and they are all unique. Murano glass – one of the most desirable gifts from Italy, although, in principle, to buy products made from Murano glass is possible in many parts of the world. Murano glass-makers still insist that authentic Murano glass is fabricated only in Murano.
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Metal sculpture by James Corbett

Metal sculpture by James Corbett

Metal sculpture by James Corbett

Australian artist and sculptor James Corbett, from Ningi, Queensland, creates unique artworks from car parts. Nothing is bent into shape; the original integrity of each car part is maintained. “The parts themselves are often interesting, some are as much as eighty years old”, says James Corbett. Since 1999 Metal sculpture by James Corbett has been successfully participating in exhibitions in Australia, England, Switzerland, New Zealand, Japan, the United Arab Emirates and the U.S.A.
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Ganesha in Indian art

Ganesha in Indian art

Tryakshara Ganapati in Delightful Disposition. Brass Sculpture

Ganesha in Indian art. Ganesha is a popular religious figure in Indian art. He is portrayed standing, dancing, taking action against demons, though having a playful behavior. Ganesha has the head of an elephant and a human body with a big belly. He has four arms, sometimes more. Ganesha carries various weapons, but is not known to have ever used them. The earliest known stone statue of Ganesha with an inscription dated to 531, found in northern China. In Japan the Ganesha cult was first mentioned in 806. Statues of Ganesha are found in Hindu art of Java, Bali, Borneo, Burma, Cambodia, Thailand. 5th century image of Ganesha was found at Gardez, Afghanistan. In Buddhist Thailand, Ganesha is regarded as a remover of obstacles, the god of success.
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Hyperrealistic wood carving by Fraser Smith

'American Jacket' Carved wood & mixed media, 2010. Hyperrealistic wood carving by American artist Fraser Smith

‘American Jacket’ Carved wood & mixed media, 2010. Hyperrealistic wood carving by Fraser Smith

The art technique creating the optical illusion is known as Trompe-l’oeil. American wood carver from Florida Fraser Smith has mastered this technique to perfection. Hyperrealistic wood carving by Fraser Smith is so deceiving that viewers when looking at these sculptures, can not believe it’s not a real cloth. The artist himself says – “I might be the only person in the world that does what I do, but there’s probably a really good reason for that”. At each exhibition he is dealing with the same cry: “Wow, is it really made ​​of wood?”. Yes, it is – Fraser carves all his works from the soft wood stains and oil paints. Fraser himself believes, that it is not even accurate simulation of textile, but simply human psychology. Coming to the exhibition the viewer sees the jacket and automatically thinks about it as a jacket made of textile, nothing else. But when they find out that it is a wood painted clothing, the brains reconfigures, and here comes the surprise.
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Art Deco era sculptor Demetre Chiparus

Russian ballet dancers in Art Deco sculpture of Demetre Chiparus

Russian ballet dancers in Art Deco sculpture of Demetre Chiparus

Romanian Art Deco era sculptor Demetre Chiparus (16 September 1886 – 22 January 1947) created realistic bronze ivory sculptures inspired by Russian dancers – Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. The faces of ‘Persian Dance’ figures reveal the likenesses of Vaslav Nijinsky and Ida Rubinstein, and the dress in ‘Starfish Girl’ exactly reproduces the sketch for Goldfish’s dress from the ballet ‘Underwater kingdom’ by Lev Annensky. For his work Chiparus used the photos of Russian and French dancers, stars and models from fashion magazines of his time. His revived bronze is a manifestation of Art Deco style highlighting the timeless beauty of the dancers and fashion of the period.
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Most expensive loss of world art

Vincent Van Gogh 'Poppies' Most expensive loss of world art

Most expensive loss of world art. Vincent Van Gogh ‘Poppies’. Cost – about $ 50 million

Most expensive loss of world art. It is not a secret that on the black market sale of art objects is on demand, it’s inferior to trade in drugs, weapons and sexual services. Not surprisingly, the art world looses annually tens of thousands of paintings, sculptures, prints, collages, the value of which increases every year. Here is a list of the ten most expensive works of art stolen, whose fate remains a mystery. Dutch postmodernist painting by Vincent Van Gogh ‘Poppies’ was stolen in 2010 from the Cairo Mohamed Mahmoud Khalil Museum, which was about to be closed for repairs. Hoping to seize the painting intelligence agencies blocked airports, train stations, ports, but all efforts were in vain. A few years later the British experts made ​​a sensational statement that the real “Poppies” were stolen from the museum in 1977 and thieves risked freedom for forgery
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